Last edited by Kashura
Friday, January 31, 2020 | History

2 edition of Economic growth and the ending of the transatlantic slave trade found in the catalog.

Economic growth and the ending of the transatlantic slave trade

Eltis, David

Economic growth and the ending of the transatlantic slave trade

  • 390 Want to read
  • 12 Currently reading

Published by Oxford University Press in New York .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Slave trade -- Great Britain,
  • Slave trade -- Africa,
  • Slave trade -- America,
  • Antislavery movements -- Great Britain

  • Edition Notes

    StatementDavid Eltis.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiii, 418 p. :
    Number of Pages418
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL23803532M
    ISBN 100195045637

    The retention of female slaves in Africa hints at subtle changes in gender roles and contributed to both polygyny many wives and patriarchy male power. Certainly, the enormous profits made on the backs of enslaved African plantation workers provided the large sums of money needed for the rapid industrial expansion that took place in Britain. This author also examines elements that pertain to agriculture, such as rainfall and the labor inputs for each crop. This culminated in with the Sam Sharpe rebellion in Jamaica, reports of which had a direct impact on Parliament's decision to end colonial slavery.

    It was the most difficult to locate primary sources, especially in comparison to secondary sources. The northern states balked, saying it gave southern states an unfair advantage. During the first Atlantic system most of these traders were Portuguese, giving them a near-monopoly during the era, although some Dutch, English, Spanish and French traders also participated in the slave trade. Interpreting the export figures in terms of African historical demography has posed as much of a problem as the computation of the export volume.

    The sources below include primary sources, secondary sources, maps, vignettes, and definitions. Miller examines the volume of the eighteenth-century Angolan slave exports, including the geographical origin of the slaves in west-central Africa and their distribution in Brazil. Simon and Schuster, Such a wave of ideas was, in turn, enabled by the emergence of a national "public opinion", via the growth of newspapers and other types of printed matter, and relatively high levels of literacy. However, the most relevant section is the second, which discusses the impact the slave trade had on Europe, specifically with the French, the Dutch, and the Germans.


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Economic growth and the ending of the transatlantic slave trade book

Not only do they showcase the scope of the trade, but this collection also includes maps indicating wind patterns and ports involved in the slave trade.

Since these growth theories were quite influential in the s and s, it is to be expected that they informed the agenda of many historical investigations and that the resulting historical investigations underrated the importance of international trade.

The first stage was the capture of people on the African mainland, and their movement to the coast. Along with this, they also captured native Canary Islanders, the Guanchesto use as slaves both on the Islands and across the Christian Mediterranean. Probably the aspect of the Atlantic slave trade that has received the most lively debate is its impact on African populations.

But if you see something that doesn't look right, click here to contact us! Meillassoux argues that slavery in the Sudanese region of West Africa developed originally in response to the socioeconomic and political conditions created by the trans-Saharan slave trade, but that the system was later sustained by the expansion of transatlantic slave exports.

Brazil outlawed the slave trade inbut the smuggling of new slaves into Brazil did not end entirely until the country finally enacted emancipation in A number of African kings and merchants took part in the trading of enslaved people from to about David Eltis has compared the numbers to the rate of emigration from Europe during this period.

The West Indian colonies of the European powers were some of their most important possessions, so they went to extremes to protect and retain them. Typically, two captives were chained together at the ankle, and columns of captives were tied together by ropes around their necks. Whitestone, This writer is writing about his viewpoints on the treatment of slaves throughout history, but especially the slaves from Africa, as the transatlantic slave trade was occurring during his lifetime.

By far the most successful West Indian colonies in belonged to the United Kingdom. As the demand for slaves grew, the Portuguese began to enter the interior of Africa to forcibly take captives; as other Europeans became involved in the slave trade, generally they remained on the coast and purchased captives from Africans who had transported them from the interior.

In the North and Great Britain, cotton mills hummed, while the financial and shipping industries also saw gains. Four million enslaved people exported via the Red Seaanother four million [20] through the Swahili ports of the Indian Oceanperhaps as many as nine million along the trans-Saharan caravan route, and eleven to twenty million depending on the author across the Atlantic Ocean.

In the nineteenth century alone over 50 million people left Europe for the Americas, a far higher rate than were ever taken from Africa. This article is a good resource to get a clear picture of the story of one slave, but it is not narrow enough that it should be cited often. This view has been criticized for its failure to take into account the devastating consequences of the trade for the much larger regions from which the captives were violently procured van Dantzig Those slaves who survived capture and the journey to the coast would then face the Atlantic crossing, which was every bit as terrible as popular memory would have it, although some attempts were made to improve conditions during the closing years of the trade.

Slaves on an American plantation operating a cotton gin. More services and features. Excerpted by permission of Duke University Press.Nov 11,  · INTRODUCTION The Atlantic slave trade, also known as the transatlantic slave trade, was the trade of African people supplied to the colonies of the New World that occurred in and around the Atlantic Ocean.

It lasted from the 16th century to the 19th century. Most slaves were shipped from West Africa and Central Africa and. Economic Growth and the Ending of the Transatlantic Slave Trade by David Eltis () [David Eltis] on atlasbowling.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying atlasbowling.com: $ Debates over the economic, social, and political meaning of slavery and the slave trade have persisted for over two hundred years.

The Rise and Fall of the Slave Trade

The Atlantic Slave Trade brings clarity and critical insight to the subject. In fourteen essays, leading scholars consider the nature and impact of the transatlantic slave trade and assess its meaning for the people transported and for those who owned atlasbowling.com /5(2).

4 David Eltis, Economic Growth and the Ending of the Transatlantic Slave Trade (New York, I), 5 Ibid. 6 Also see his 'Fluctuations in the age and sex ratios of slaves in the nineteenth-century transatlantic slave traffic', Slavery and Abolition, vii, 3 (I), ; and 'Nutritional.

The ending of the slave trade was one of the greatest things that England ever did. What did it take to end this atrocity?

How Slavery Became the Economic Engine of the South

The ending of the slave trade was due to spiritual, political and economic factors. Spiritual factors contributed to the ending of the trans-Atlantic slave trade. Not long after the American War of Independence, lowcountry rice planters, aggressively pro-slavery, decided that the new nation’s transatlantic slave trade must stop eventually.

In the s and s, southern slaveholders had selfish reasons for criticizing the transatlantic slave trade.